death to america

hasta la victoria siempre

23,489 notes

weeaboo stories

jncos:

Oh man, I’ve got this great story about weeaboos. First of all, to clarify, I’m not really that into anime and I am certainly not much of a weeaboo myself. Anyway, I was opening a meeting of my local anime club (I am the president) when

(via khargooshy)

2 notes

Radio New Zealand - NZ's Invasion of Samoa in 1914 (48'18")

One hundred years ago this month, just a week after the declaration of what became the First World War, Britain asked New Zealand to disable a radio mast in German Samoa. It gladly accepted, sent an invasion force, seized the German colony and ruled it for the next 48 years. How did this come about and what is the German legacy in Samoa? Don Wiseman of Radio New Zealand International has been digging into a period of our history and found a fascinating era that has not been extensively documented.

Filed under history samoa new zealand imperialism wwi

41 notes

Yes, I was the friend of Saint-Just! But Saint-Just was not a conspirator; if he had been, he would still be in power and you would exist no more. Ah! His crime, if he committed one, was his failure to form a sacred conspiracy against those who plotted liberty’s ruin! 

O day of Fleurus! You must blend your laurels, which nothing can wither, with the funeral cypress that shades my friend’s tomb. And you, Pichegru, Jourdan, companions of his exploits and glory, you will do him justice. You are warriors, you should be frank. Good faith has always been the virtue of heroes. You will tell what the fatherland owes his virtues and his courage. You will not betray the truth, you will not serve envy, for one day you would be victims of the crime whose accomplices you had become. You will tell what he did against traitors and how he exercised the national authority with needful severity; how he gave an example of frugality and courage to the troops, of activity and prudence to the generals  of humanity and equality to all those who approached him…Pliant and sociable in private matters, he was sometimes irascible, severe, and inexorable when the country was involved. Then he became a lion, listening no longer, breaking down all barriers, trampling all considerations under foot, and his austerity imparted fear to his friends and gave him a somber, ferocious air with manners despotic and terrible, forcing him afterward to reflect on the immense dangers involved in the exercise of absolute power, when it is entrusted to men whose heads are not as well organized as their hearts as pure.

Such was the man who, hardly twenty-seven, was cut down by a Revolution to which he has consecrated his existence and who has left long regrets to his country and to friendship.

 When Gateau wrote to the authorities asking why he had been arrested, he received a single sentence as reply: ‘Friend of the Conspirator Saint Just.’ Gateu responded with the above eulogy. 

(Source: bunniesandbeheadings, via lovegodsmashtyrants)